Should you be driving?

Aussie drink-driving laws have similar penalties, but our BAC level is still at .05. This will be moved to .02 in the coming years.
Be safe for you, your family and the person you may injure because, you thought you were ‘ok to drive!’

SHOULD YOU BE DRIVING? DON'T DRINK AND DRIVE....EVER!

TEST YOURSELF NOW

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Researchers map out a cellular mechanism that offers a biological explanation for alcoholism, and could lead to treatments

You can lead a lab rat to sugar water, but you can’t make him drink—especially if there’s booze around.

New research published Thursday in Science may offer insights into why some humans who drink alcohol develop an addiction whereas most do not. After caffeine, alcohol is the most commonly consumed psychoactive substance in the world. For the majority of people the occasional happy hour beer or Bloody Mary brunch is where it stops. Yet we all know that others will drink compulsively, despite whatever consequence or darkness it brings.

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Tom Hardy, who receives a CBE for services to drama, made his name on the big screen with a series of hard man roles.

The 40-year-old actor is known for Inception, Mad Max: Fury Road, Bronson and The Revenant.

The privately-educated star has spoken about how he went off the rails and suffered from alcohol addiction in his youth.

Hardy checked himself into rehab in 2003 and has been clean ever since.

“I went in thinking I’d do it for a little bit until I can go out and drink and people forgive me. But I did my 28 days, and after listening to people who had been through similar circumstances I realised I did have a problem,”

For complete story

Author: Mark Gold, MD May 2018 

Supplying alcohol to their adolescent children is not associated with any reduction of harm. Quite the opposite—parents who allow and support adolescent drinking actually increased their risk of incurring alcohol-related harm. Further, the myth that parental supply of alcohol, or supervision of alcohol consumption will teach adolescents how to drink responsibly is just that—a myth.

Recently, Mattick, et al, conducted a prospective study using data culled from the Australian Parental Supply of Alcohol Longitudinal Study of adolescents to examine correlations between parental supply of alcohol and subsequent drinking outcomes over the 6-year period of adolescence. Children in grade seven and their parents were recruited and surveyed annually. In total, 1927 eligible parents and adolescents were recruited by June of 2011 and were followed until 2016.

The researchers found that the odds of subsequent binge consumption, alcohol-related harm and symptoms of alcohol-use disorder were increased for adolescents who were supplied alcohol only by parents (odds ratios, 2.58, 2.53, and 2.51, respectively) when compared with parents who did not supply alcohol to their children.

In this prospective study, associations between both parental supply of alcohol and supply from other sources, and after adjusting for known covariates, revealed pattern of harm associated with parental supply. By the sixth follow-up (mean age 17·8 years), parental supply of alcohol was found to be associated with binge drinking, alcohol-related harm, and symptoms of alcohol use disorder. The findings also revealed that parental supply not only increases adverse outcomes itself, it also risks increasing obtaining alcohol from other non-parental sources.

Plainly stated, there is no evidence to support the view that parents who supply alcohol to their teens protect them from adverse drinking outcomes. The authors write. “Parents should be advised that this practice is associated with risk, both directly and indirectly through increased access to alcohol from other sources.”

For complete article  

Posted: May 26, 2018 

Want to reduce your risk of cancer by 40 percent? Stop eating bacon (and all processed meat) and drinking alcohol, according to a new set of health guidelines. The new guidelines from the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) are part of a ten-point plan to help you reduce your risk of cancer. The guidelines are based on a study of more than 50 million people, which the WCRF says is the largest cancer study ever conducted.

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Modern mums were supposed to have it all, but the reality is far from the dream. Today the Sunday Herald Sun launches a three-part series highlighting what life is really like for too many hard-working mothers. This week we look at the increasing role of alcohol in their lives 

STRESSED middle-aged women now rank as one of the most at-risk groups of drinkers amid warnings of a looming health crisis. 

Alcohol-related hospital admissions for women increased 55 per cent state-wide in the decade to the end of 2015, from 8095 to 12,534. 

A Sunday Herald Sun investigation has highlighted the private pressures women face as they juggle motherhood with working, ageing parents and domestic duties. 

It has sparked calls for more support and better understanding of a “sandwich generation” of women as it’s revealed: WOMEN’S admissions to The Alfred hospital for alcohol treatment are approaching men’s for the first time; IN hotspot Bayside, the rate of women admitted to hospital for alcohol-related harms in 2014-15 exceeded that for men; ALCOHOL-RELATED hospitalisations for women rose sharply in Cardinia (up 395 per cent), Melton (up 233 per cent), South Gippsland (up 185 per cent), Frankston (up 149 per cent), Wyndham (up 148 per cent), Casey (up 139 per cent), Yarra Ranges (up 125 per cent), Bayside (125 per cent) and Geelong (up 109 per cent) in the decade to 2014-15 ; ONE sobriety support group reported around 70 per cent of those seeking help were women; and ABOUT 20 per cent of Victorian women report high levels of psychological distress. 

Mounting stress and life’s pressures are being blamed for more women turning to alcohol. 

AMA president Dr Michael Gannon said midlife women were now drinking “more than Gen Ys, Millennials and more than their parents (did)”. “The blokey machismo of 15 beers on a Friday night has been overcome and replaced by a normalisation of overconsumption of white wine by females,” he said.  

Melbourne GP Grant Blashki said his clinic saw women battling to fulfil multiple roles. “A lot of women who come to the clinic and seem overwhelmed with juggling multiple roles in career and home, and often multi-generational responsibilities to kids, parents and their partner,’’ Dr Blashki said. 

“People say, ‘I really can’t sleep, so I have a few drinks. I really can’t relax, but I find if I have a few drinks it turns my mind off.” 

VicHealth’s Maya Rivis said a link had been found between alcohol consumption and women’s psychological distress. 

“About 20 per cent of Victorian women report having high levels of psychological distress, many who suffer from depression or anxiety may drink to address those symptoms,” she said. “Women still do the bulk of the domestic work, the stress that comes with trying to juggle full-time work with domestic chores, and children — who are very active today so mums are juggling that with work and chores — means there’s very little time to recover. The more you drink and the more often you’re exceeding half a bottle, you’re putting yourself at risk.”  

The Alfred hospital drug and alcohol physician Dr Benny Monheit saw more middle-aged women needing support for alcohol use.  For complete article  May 27 issue of The Herald Sun Digital Edition.   WENDY TUOHY  

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