Should you be driving?

Aussie drink-driving laws have similar penalties, but our BAC level is still at .05. This will be moved to .02 in the coming years.
Be safe for you, your family and the person you may injure because, you thought you were ‘ok to drive!’

SHOULD YOU BE DRIVING? DON'T DRINK AND DRIVE....EVER!

TEST YOURSELF NOW

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View the eNews April 2019

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A wristband that lets wearers check if their drink has been spiked with a date rape drug has gone on sale in Germany.

How the wristband works

To use the wristband users stir their drink with a straw.

They then place a few drops on the white band and wait two minutes, if the test area turns blue they know their drink has been spiked.

Kim says that it is already having a positive impact on young women's lives.

"We donated some to a group of girls and they told me that they really like the wristbands. It makes them feel more aware and more safe.

"I also gave a girl a wristband and afterwards she was in conversation with a boy at a party and he asked her what it was.

"She told him 'it's a wristband that protects me from date rape drugs' and he was like 'wow' and he stepped back. She said it made her feel very strong."

"What happened to the girl at the festival felt so close to me. As if this could have happened to me and, I realised the danger so of course I have the wristband with me when I go out."

Eventually Kim would like to make products which can detect other drugs.

For complete story

30 April 2019 https://doi.org/10.1111/dar.12933

Abstract

Introduction and Aims: Public support for restrictions on late night trading of licensed venues increased substantially between 2001 and 2013, a period with very few policy interventions in Australia. In early 2014 a set of high profile restrictions were introduced in Sydney, New South Wales. In this study, we examine whether these 2014 policy interventions affected public support for late trading restrictions.

Discussion and Conclusion: Support for late trading restrictions fell sharply, especially among those affected in New South Wales. Advocates for public health‐oriented alcohol policy restrictions need to pay attention to public support in the aftermath of policy ‘wins’.

30 April 2019 https://doi.org/10.1111/dar.12929

Abstract

Introduction and Aims: We tested whether incidental exposure to alcohol marketing messages in sporting events: (i) influenced automatic evaluation of brands and alcohol in general; and (ii) if these processes occur through deliberative (conscious) or non‐conscious processes.

Results: We found a positive main effect of incidental exposure to alcohol brands on indirect measures of attitudes toward alcohol as well as the specific brand. No effect of cognitive fatigue on indirect measure toward brands and alcohol was observed.

Discussion and Conclusions: Incidental exposure to alcohol marketing messages appear to impact indirect measures of attitudes toward the brand and alcohol in general, and seems to rely on non‐conscious automatic processes.

Blood pressure and stroke risk rise steadily the more alcohol people drink, and previous claims that one or two drinks a day might protect against stroke are not true, according to the results of a major genetic study.

The research, which used data from a 160,000-strong cohort of Chinese adults, many of whom are unable to drink alcohol due to genetic intolerance, found that people who drink moderately - consuming 10 to 20 grams of alcohol a day - raise their risk of stroke by 10 to 15 percent.

For heavy drinkers, consuming four or more drinks a day, blood pressure rises significantly and the risk of stroke increases by around 35 percent, the study found.

"The key message here is that, at least for stroke, there is no protective effect of moderate drinking," said Zhengming Chen, a professor at Oxford University's Nuffield Department of Population Health who co-led the research. "The genetic evidence shows the protective effect is not real."

"Using genetics is a novel way ... to sort out whether moderate drinking really is protective, or whether it's slightly harmful," said Iona Millwood, an epidemiologist at Oxford who co-led the study. "Our genetic analyses have helped us understand the cause-and-effect relationships."

… the biological effects of alcohol should be the same for all people worldwide.

For complete article  

From Executive Summary: This study finds that alcohol advertising deals are widespread in the AFL and NRL men’s competitions. The promotion of alcohol brands is spread across a number of channels, including merchandise, training and playing kit. However, alcohol advertising across the codes is not ubiquitous, with one team in each league having no commercial partnerships with alcohol companies, while a number of others have no major alcohol industry partners. This indicates that alcohol advertising deals are not a pre-requisite for success or popularity of AFL and NRL teams.

For complete Report