• “The Dalgarno Institute’s Humpty Dumpty Dilemma, AOD Education presentation was on point. They didn’t pull any punches in delivering a message that was powerful and persuasive, talking about the attitudes towards drug and alcohol use. They used real life examples of the impact of drugs and alcohol on people’s lives and didn’t shy away from challenging stereotypes, cultures and individuals.  To hold the attention of a room full of teenagers is quite a feat and he made it look easy. 

    Comments and conversations with teaching staff after the seminar also affirmed the success of the presentation, with one teacher actually saying he not only valued the presentation, but also did not expect the positive response from the students, considering they were ‘pulled’ from other classes they wanted to attend.”

    Michael Walker, Chaplain. 
    Kerang Technical High School

  • Thank you for coming to Berengarra and delivering your “No Brainer” program. You made a special effort to accommodate the needs of our students and timetable and this was very much appreciated.  The presenter was engaging and enthusiastic, and kept the attention of all the students and staff for 90 minutes. The presentation including the PowerPoint and music and were of a very high quality. The presentation was a great mix imagery, personal stories, facts and statistics that kept the attention of all of our year 8, 9 and 10 students.

    Staff commented on how well the presentation was delivered and received, and would like to work with the Dalgarno institute in the future.

    Claire McIntyre - Student Counsellor
    Berengarra Box Hill Campus

  • We were all very impressed with the way the Dalgarno Institute NO Brainer Presentations captivated the student’s attention over the 90 minute sessions, including cohorts from year 9 and 12…The talks are vibrant and the use of inclusive teaching strategies is commendable

    The presentations helped many of our students consider their decisions about drugs and the social situations that they may encounter involving drugs.

    Many students approach staff after the seminars expressing their appreciation of having been given the opportunity of hearing your message. Several students had also sought teachers’ advice with concerns about their own experiences with drugs as a result of the presentations. 

    Ruth Burton – Coordinator, Health 
    Paul Wilson – Principal Golden 
    Grove High School (Adelaide)

 

We express deep concern at the high price paid by society and by individuals and their families as a result of the world drug problem, and pay special tribute to those who have sacrificed their lives and those who dedicate themselves to addressing and countering the world drug problem…

We commit to safeguarding our future and ensuring that no one affected by the world drug problem is left behind by enhancing our efforts to bridge the gaps in addressing the persistent and emerging trends and challenges through the implementation of balanced, integrated, comprehensive, multidisciplinary and scientific evidence-based responses to the world drug problem, placing the safety, health and well-being of all members of society, in particular our youth and children, at the centre of our efforts… 

UNODC – Commission On Narcotic Drugs – Vienna: 2019 Ministerial Declaration (page 3 & 5)

Families and particularly children, should never, ever be casualties of drug use, by anyone. 

It certainly is a gross injustice and heinous social irresponsibility to have policies that increase demand for, and/or access to, illicit drugs which facilitate the costly harms not easily repaired. 

The mantra that we ‘cannot arrest our way out of the drug problem’ is true. However, we also understand that we most definitely will not be able to ‘treat our way out of the drug problem’ either. 

There must be a health, education and legal approach, working in concert and that focuses on demand reduction, prevention and recovery from drug use. This journey approach that properly harnesses the three pillars of the National Drug Strategy – Demand Reduction – Supply Reduction – Harm Reduction, for the purpose of helping build a resilient culture that doesn’t need or want drugs, will see the healthy, productive and safe culture the United Nations Office of Drugs & Crime, and the World Health Organisation are pursuing.  

 

University of Queensland drugs expert Jake Najman said information given to students on drugs should not be a “half an hour school lesson”. Professor Najman said governments needed to invest in developing intensive, long-term drug education for students. “It’s a much more systematic problem that needs real commitment and not just a headline saying, ‘Don’t do it’,” he said. 

23 February 2018, Brisbane Times

We couldn’t agree more; that’s why we had developed our ‘all of school’ incursions and curriculum, along with our ‘all of community’ education seminars – including sporting clubs, parents, community leaders and policy makers! Changing the cultural narrative on drug use is a long game, in which the Dalgarno Institute has been a key stakeholder for over 150 years. Our consistent demand reduction and proactive prevention messaging and resources, have been effective in doing just that, when fully engaged by the community.

Second updated edition

Prevention strategies based on scientific evidence working with families, schools, and communities can ensure that children and youth, especially the most marginalized and poor, grow and stay healthy and safe into adulthood and old age. For every dollar spent on prevention, at least ten can be saved in future health, social and crime costs

http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/prevention/prevention-standards.html