'minimising harm by maximising prevention'




ambo stats

Data Site

Introduction: Welcome to AODstats, the Victorian alcohol and drug interactive statistics and mapping webpage.
AODstats provides information on the harms related to alcohol, illicit and pharmaceutical drug use in Victoria.

For more details
visit the website now

Pin It

Comments: There is currently no high-quality evidence supporting pharmacological treatment to control drinking in patients with alcohol use disorder. The risks of incomplete outcome data or selective outcome reporting were identified by this report. In addition, no study demonstrated a benefit on health outcomes. More evidence is needed on this topic.

Nicolas Bertholet, MD, MSc

Pharmacologically controlled drinking in the treatment of alcohol dependence or alcohol use disorders: a systematic review with direct and network metaanalyses on nalmefene, naltrexone, acamprosate, baclofen and topiramate. Addiction. 2018;113(2):220–237.

Pin It

“When you quit drinking you stop waiting.” — Caroline Knapp

On December 8th, with a tequila hangover, I decided to put the bottle down for 30 days of sobriety. Which meant I was sober over Christmas. Which means I was sober over New Years Eve.

With 21 days of sobriety under my belt, this is the longest I’ve gone without alcohol since I drank my first wine cooler at 17 years old. That sentence alone is enough to shock me into clearing out my liquor cabinet.

I’m not claiming addiction, but my relationship with alcohol was not getting me any closer to the person I wanted to be. Hangovers made me lazy and complacent. I would put off work until the headache went away, and I would use my weekends as an emotional crutch to the frustration and stress I felt during the workweek.

I used alcohol to avoid dealing with difficult emotions. I used it as a crutch when I got stuck creatively. It was the thing I went to when the words or ideas stopped flowing, or when the real work of being an entrepreneur began. When I kicked off my 30 days, I wrote an article about unfollowing any alcohol-centric Instagram accounts (you can read the article here). I can say this has definitely helped me in being successful at staying sober this time around.

Being sober has been life changing, here’s 21 reasons why.

1. I’m getting quality sleep

2. I’m more aware of my body

3. I’m hydrated, and it shows

4. Speaking of energy. . .

5. My diet has improved

6. I’m saving money

7. I’ve realized people and moments are more important than the booze you pair it with

This is a funny one. Alcohol is joyous, right? Well. . .in my case, no. Yes, there are joyous occasions in which we celebrate with alcohol, but if you take the booze away, it’s still a celebration. I’ve had a hard time feeling nostalgic for moments I’ve celebrated or cemented with alcohol. Like popping that bottle of champagne on a snowmobile after saying ‘I-do’ to my husband the day we got married. But I’ve realized in being sober that I’m more grateful for the moment and the people I’m celebrating with than the alcohol I’m using to celebrate with. Being sober in joyous moments has made me more present, more attentive, gentler and more patient.

8. I have more time (and energy) to do things that bring me joy (not just a buzz)

When you don’t spend your nights at happy hour, or your weekend mornings catching a buzz at brunch, you have a lot more free time to cultivate new hobbies, or habits that bring you actual fulfillment and joy. Instead of chasing a buzz, I’m spending my time on personal growth, cultivating a healthy marriage, experiencing life, trying new things, and diving deeper into my creativity.

9. My shame around alcohol has disappeared

When I’d wake up with a hangover, my shame would pound just as hard as my head. I would lay in bed thinking “real entrepreneurs don’t wake up with hangovers all the time, they would never waste time like this.” It’s no secret that the most successful entrepreneurs capitalize on being peak performers. You can’t access peak states when you feel like shit or when your brain is foggy. I knew alcohol was keeping me from performing at my best, and so I developed a pretty intense shame around drinking. But, now that I’m not drinking, this shame has also disappeared.

10. Sobriety has convinced me I can do hard things

I’ve tried to ‘get sober,’ drink less, drink once a week, only have one drink per night, etc., for the last couple of years. I chased my tail for a long time and would slip easily off the wagon at the first whiff of a party or glass of Malbec. My constant failure made me believe that I was in fact a failure. It’s what Benjamin Hardy calls self-signaling. Through my behavior of constantly failing at a seemingly simple task (not drinking alcohol), I was convincing myself that I was in fact a failure incapable of sticking to anything I set my mind to. Now that I’ve stuck to it, I’m rewriting my subconscious and convincing myself that I am in fact capable of doing hard things, of finishing what I start, of being successful. This effect is spilling over into other areas of my life as well, like in my writing career.

11. I’m learning to be me again

Alcohol does this funny thing where it lowers your inhibitions and makes us more confident in being or acting a certain way. When I stopped drinking, and went to my first party, I realized how awkward I felt, how boring and introverted I was sober. But in shedding this crutch, I’ve realized a lot of my life I’ve been living from a guarded and inauthentic place. I wasn’t letting the world see who I am, and I was stifling my personality because it felt too scary to be my vulnerable, messy, human self. Now that I’ve removed the alcohol crutch, I’m discovering who I am behind the wine and tequila. It’s difficult and incredible. It feels uncomfortable, but it’s the most sure I’ve ever felt.

12. I’m learning a lot of fun stuff

13. I’m learning to speak my truth

14. When I speak my truth, my relationships improve

15. I remember things now

Like the details, the small things that make up this beautiful life. Details like the constant hum of crickets, birds and geckos in the jungle. The small things, like the metronome tempo of the ocean breaking against the beach. All sorts of beautiful things that alcohol blends together into nothingness, those are the things I remember and live for, and I’m grateful to experience them every day.

16. I feel healthier

Alcohol is a toxin, as soon as you drink it, your body has to do the difficult work of cleansing your body of it. Which means while your body is busy flushing the toxins out, it’s not healing. Just knowing I haven’t put alcohol into my body makes me feel healthier, like I’m doing my beautiful body a huge favor.

17. Sobriety has put me ahead of the curve

18. My healthy lifestyle isn’t being immediately thrown in the trash by boozing

19. Sobriety has made me realize how distracted I was

20. Sobriety has proved to me that my identity isn’t fixed.

21. I wake up feeling great

The older I get, the worse my hangovers are. One glass of wine would give me a hangover, the shame-scaries, and make me sleepy by noon. Now I wake up at 5am with energy, purpose and a clear head. It’s the best way to start the day.

Take Action! Your writing career begins and ends with your lifestyle, environment and mindset. I created a free training, which distills my years of writing struggle, so you can create a life and environment that supports your writing dreams, without wasting years of your life.

For Complete Article

Pin It

Mar 8, 2018

In its 132-year history, Coca-Cola has produced a panoply of drinks alongside its signature soda, including bottled water, juices, sports beverages and an Indian refreshment described as “spicy,” “mature” and “masculine.”

This year, the company is mixing in booze.

In Japan, a fiercely competitive market where Coca-Cola says it introduces 100 new products each year, the company plans to test a flavoured, bubbly drink spiked with alcohol.

Coca-Cola has never before ventured into the so-called alcopop sector. But fizzy drinks made with alcohol, fruit juice and sparkling water or soda, a category known as chu-hi in Japan, are popular across the country.

The new drink is the latest idea from a beverage maker that has expanded to new markets with an array of products as the sugary-soda industry, battered by concerns about its health effects, continues its multi-decade decline.

In 2016, Coca-Cola said it unveiled the equivalent of nearly two new products globally every day.

Jorge Garduño, who has led the company’s Japanese division since July, said in an interview on the Coca-Cola website that the chu-hi gambit was “a modest experiment for a specific slice of our market”.

Coca-Cola said it had no additional details about the drink, and no plans to offer it in other markets.

“I don’t think people around the world should expect to see this kind of thing from Coca-Cola,” Mr Garduño said in the interview.

While many markets are becoming more like Japan, I think the culture here is still very unique and special, so many products that are born here will stay here.”

The term chu-hi is an Japanese amalgamation of the words “highball,” a mixed drink, and “Shochu,” a spirit that can be distilled from rice barley, sweet potatoes and other ingredients. Chu-hi drinks are available across the country. Some are concocted on the spot in restaurants, but most are sold in cans at supermarkets, convenience stores and liquor shops or in vending machines.

The beverages are typically more affordable than other alcoholic drinks because their alcohol content, which is usually from 2 to 9 percent, means they are taxed less than stronger drinks.

For complete article - New York Times


Pin It

Benadryl is a widely used medication for treating allergy symptoms, but it can cause problems when mixed with alcohol.

The risks associated with mixing Benadryl and alcohol may not apply to everyone or every situation. It is possible that consuming small amounts of alcohol while taking Benadryl in a safe environment will cause no harm. However, the safest option is simply to abstain from alcohol while taking Benadryl.

Under no circumstances should Benadryl and alcohol be mixed before engaging in any activity that required mental alertness, such as driving.

If someone else has either intentionally or unintentionally mixed Benadryl with alcohol, it is important to ensure they are in a safe environment, where they can rest, if need be.

It is best to consult with a doctor to determine when it would be safe to consume alcohol after taking Benadryl, as this will depend on other factors, such as age or other courses of medication.

For complete article

Pin It

BMC Public Health BMC series  https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5199-x  Published: 1 March 2018

By 2050, around 22% of the world population will be aged 60 and over, with a significant proportion of these older individuals having a “pattern or level of drinking which places them at harm” p.656 [3]. In comparison to younger people, older adults are more susceptible to the detrimental effects of alcohol, as their tolerance to alcohol lowers with age. In addition, older people are also more likely to take prescription medications which, when taken with alcohol, can reduce effectiveness of medication, exacerbate side effects or even lead to the development of new illnesses [4].

Drinking more than five standard drinks per week and a history of an alcohol problem in men over the age of 50 has been found to quadruple the risk of developing psychiatric problems including depression and memory loss [56]. Cognitive impairment can lead to an increased likelihood of falls [7] and because older people often have weaker bones, this can lead to hip fractures, which is one of the highest causes of death in the older population [8]

Type of interventions

Interventions used in trials included varying techniques and some used more than one intervention group, and these are listed below:

  • Motivational Enhancement [19]
  • Brief Motivational Intervention [23]
  • Brief Advice [19]
  • SHARE (Senior Health and Alcohol Risk Education) [17]
  • Brief Intervention (BI) - used BI protocol including a workbook containing feedback on individuals’ behaviours and other educational resources. Two appointments, one month apart consisting of the intervention and then a reinforcement session [22]
  • Personalised reports on risks and problems [1820]
  • Educational tools [182122]
  • Diaries [20]
  • Telephone Counselling [1720]


This study has shown that while there is a growing evidence base for interventions for alcohol use in older individuals, there is still a need to conduct more research in the field to understand more about alcohol use in later life, and specifically understand which interventions work and for whom. Currently, interventions are aimed at general populations rather than focusing on older people. Older people are affected disproportionately by lifestyle changes such as bereavement, social isolation and loneliness and worklessness which may affect alcohol consumption [9]. More work is needed to establish the relationship between these factors and patterns of drinking in older people and also to look at varying levels of alcohol consumption across the life course, playing closer attention to stages of old age and factors such as retirement.

For complete study


  • Victoria
  • Dalgarno Central
    (Coalition of Alcohol & Drug Educators)

    Phone: 1300 975 002
    Fax: 1300 952 551
    : PO Box 7005
    Dandenong, Vic, 3175

    Contact Us

    Bendigo Campus
    Mobile: 0403 065 686
    Address: PO Box 234,
    Eaglehawk, Vic, 3556

  • New South Wales
  • Hunter VCampus
    Mobile: 0414 506 905
    Address: PO Box 19
    Cooranbong, NSW, 2265

    Sydney VCampus
    : 1300 975 002

    • South Australia
    • SA Campus
      Mobile: 0448 749 800
      Address: 1 Collingrove Ave
      Broadview, SA, 5083
      Latest Newsletter
  • Other
  • P.A.D.D
    Mobile: 1300 975 002