Should you be driving?

Aussie drink-driving laws have similar penalties, but our BAC level is still at .05. This will be moved to .02 in the coming years.
Be safe for you, your family and the person you may injure because, you thought you were ‘ok to drive!’

SHOULD YOU BE DRIVING? DON'T DRINK AND DRIVE....EVER!

TEST YOURSELF NOW

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View the eNews April 2019

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05 Mar, 2019

New research from health promotion foundation VicHealth and Monash University has found Victorian men are underestimating the harm from heavy drinking, with some believing the health risks only begin at 30 drinks per session.

With Aussie men at higher risk from alcohol than women, the study looked at what influences groups of men to drink, highlighting the drinking culture among sports players and supporters, hospitality and office workers. It found:

  • 59 per cent of the men surveyed said they downed more than five drinks in one session weekly and 38 per cent said they drank more than 11 drinks in one session monthly
  • While risky drinking was highly prevalent amongst all sub-groups hospitality workers had the highest rates of risky drinking attributed to access to free drinks and the perceived necessity for winding down post-work
  • Alcohol was described by the men as a way of ‘opening-up’ to each other and many felt they couldn’t socialise without drinking – even with close mates
  • Men described their drinking as autonomous yet were observed to be heavily influenced by other men in the group through round buying, being pressured to drink or making fun of those who chose ‘fruity’ drinks with lower alcohol content
  • Men were very hesitant to step in and intervene to help a mate who was drinking heavily unless he was trying to drive or drunk to the point of being completely incapacitated
  • Men described ‘inheriting’ drinking behaviours from their fathers and drinking being central to being an Australian man
  • Men were uncomfortable about the Australian drinking culture but felt powerless to change it.

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Conclusions: Our review suggests that maternal alcohol use during pregnancy is associated with offspring mental health problems, even at low to moderate levels of alcohol use. Future investigation using methods that allow stronger causal inference is needed to further investigate if these associations shown are causal. 

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RELATED STORY: Dan Murphy's Northern Territory saga reaches final hurdles before decision

RELATED STORY: Liquor giant Dan Murphy's a step closer to having Northern Territory footprint

RELATED STORY: Dan Murphy's liquor giant opponents to raise voice at Northern Territory meeting

Liquor giant Dan Murphy's faces an uphill battle in its bid to build its first Northern Territory superstore, with 17 objections lodged against the application and hearings to take longer than first expected.

Key points:

  • An NT Liquor Commission inquiry into whether or not Dan Murphy's will be permitted to be built in the NT has held its first session in Darwin
  • The hearing today heard from Woolworths' legal counsel, who spruiked the possible economic benefits the store could bring
  • Dan Murphy's are yet to formally respond to any of the 17 objections, according to NT Liquor Commission chair Richard Coates

Objectors lining up to lay out their arguments against the proposal included the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT), Danila Dilba, the NT Council of Social Services and the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE).

Most of the objections, yet to be explained in full, were expected to relate to the store's potential impact on Darwin's problem drinkers and its planned proximity to three nearby Aboriginal communities.

No representatives from Bagot, Minmarama or Kulaluk communities attended the hearing's first day.

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Date: February 2019  Source: University of Illinois at Chicago

Summary: Lasting changes in the brain caused by drinking that starts in adolescence are the result of epigenetic changes that alter the expression of a protein crucial for the formation and maintenance of neural connections in the amygdala -- the part of the brain involved in emotion, fear and anxiety.     

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Christina DeLay is co-founder of Altina Drinks, a social enterprise hoping to tip Australia’s drinking culture on its head with a range of alcohol-free cocktails. She’s this week’s changemaker.  

What first inspired you to start a company that makes alcohol-free cocktails?

It was because of my own personal experience with drinking. I was working as a consultant in Canberra, and got quite caught up in the drinking culture of that industry – after-work drinks with your colleagues, business lunches, there’s alcohol at everything. When I cut back on the drinking, I realised what an important part of the social aspect of the industry going out and drinking was.

Were you surprised at people’s responses to you not drinking?

People around me really started to wonder what was wrong and why I wasn’t drinking. I was often asked if I was pregnant, and I would go to the bar and ask if I could have a water with a slice of lime in it to make it look like an alcoholic drink, to avoid those questions.

It really felt like it was me that had a problem, because I didn’t want to drink anymore. That was a real trigger to start having a bit of a conversation about more mindful drinking and drinking on your own terms, to counteract those social pressures that are in a lot of scenarios.

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