QUESTION: What do these deadly poisons have in common: arsenic, radium, mercury, thallium, cyanide?

ANSWER: At one time they were all considered by physicians and the public as useful medications and/or healthy supplements. They were taken in a wide variety of lotions, potions, notions, tinctures, tonics, and pills. These poisons were recommended, sold, and prescribed freely by physicians.1 It took thousands of deaths and many decades before the harmful nature of these substances was perceived by physicians and the general public.  

For source: Missouri Medicine Library Volume 117 Jan 2020

Expert Tour Presenters are…

Dr. Karen Randall FAAEM

  • Chairman of the Board, SCEMA

  • VP of Case Management, SCEMA

  • Certified in Cannabis Science & Medicine

    Dr. Karen Randall trained in family medicine, pediatrics and emergency medicine.

    She worked at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit teaching emergency medicine in a large academic program and was teacher of the year several times.

    Dr. Karen is part of a large emergency medicine group called Southern Colorado Emergency Medicine Associates (SCEMA). She is both chairman of the board of SCEMA, and the Vice President of case management.

    With regards to cannabis - Dr. Karen is certified in Cannabis Science & Medicine through the University of Vermont. She has spoken internationally and across the US about the harms of cannabis.

    Dr. Karen recently published an article about emergency medicine presentations in Missouri Medicine.

    In her spare time, Dr. Karen, takes care of medically needy rescue dachshunds that no one wants. She says they are a handful, but they keep her grounded.

Lynn Riemer (A.C.T. on Drugs)

Lynn Riemer has a regional and National reputation as a speaker, trainer, and advocate on the issues related to substance abuse.

As an experienced chemist (DEA) and prior member of the North Metro Drug Task Force in Colorado, her experience and engaging style brings a real, personal, and vivid face to the issues presented by illicit drug use.

Lynn speaks regularly with students, community child advocacy groups, industrial and professional groups, and employees of local and State governmental agencies. She addresses drug awareness, recognition, and prevention.

While working with the North Metro Drug Task Force she developed intensive programs used to train emergency and community service workers in the handling of hazardous waste and the management of clandestine labs.

Additionally, she has been a member of governmental committees to create regulations for meth clean up in the state of Colorado.

Lynn has co-chaired the Drug Endangered Children program, as well as worked to create new laws protecting children who are living in homes where meth is manufactured.

She is a co-author of the book “The Methamphetamine Crisis: Strategies to Save Addicts, Families, and Communities” and received the Community Champion for Children Award from Adams & Broomfield CASA in 2010.

In 2018 Lynn received the 7Everyday Hero Award (presented to Coloradans who are making a difference in their community).