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Data Site

Introduction: Welcome to AODstats, the Victorian alcohol and drug interactive statistics and mapping webpage.
AODstats provides information on the harms related to alcohol, illicit and pharmaceutical drug use in Victoria.

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Tom Minear and James Campbell, Herald Sun - December 19, 2017 

DRINKERS would face significant price increases for beer and wine under a proposal to cut Australians’ alcohol ­consumption.

Under the draft plan, ­released by federal and state ministers, the cost of all ­alcoholic drinks would not be allowed to fall below a set level.

The draft national alcohol strategy, quietly released last month, also calls for tough ­restrictions on alcohol advertising during sport, and laws to stop bottle shops providing two-for-one offers and bulk-buy booze discounts.

Other proposals include:

NEW restrictions on the serving of drinks after a certain time, and plastic glassware to be used in “high-risk venues”;

MANDATORY sobriety conditions on repeat offenders, and linked ID scanners to ­prevent entry to venues;

UNDERCOVER checks to ensure bottle shops and venues do not serve those under age;

ASKING alcohol companies to put “readable, impactful health-related warning labels” on their products. Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt chaired last month’s ministerial forum which agreed to release the draft strategy for a final round of feedback, after three years of consultation, with the aim of finalising it by March.

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If you had told me a few years ago that my husband and I would completely cut alcohol out of our life, I would’ve laughed you off sarcastically as we raised our wine glasses for yet another clink and sip and then mocked that ridiculous comment. I mean, come on, who doesn’t drink in today’s society? Apart from certain religious groups, pregnant women or recovering alcoholics.

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December 5, 2017 by Emma Rayner

Large study links alcohol misuse to subsequent injury risk in young people

The immediate effects of drinking too much alcohol are obvious, unpleasant and can even be life threatening, but a new study has shown that young people who drink excessively, to the degree that they are admitted into hospital because of it, are also at a much higher risk of sustaining injuries in the following 6 months.

The study by researchers in the University of Nottingham's School of Medicine, funded by the NIHR, found that young people who are admitted into hospital in England because of alcohol are seven times more likely to have an injury that needs a hospital stay in the 6 months after the alcohol-related admission and 15 times more likely to end up in hospital through injury in the first month after the alcohol admission.

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Australians are drinking 25 per cent less alcohol than they were 40 years ago, but it's causing more harm than ever, a new study says.

In 2010, when the most recent figures were recorded, alcohol misuse was estimated to be responsible for 5500 deaths and 160,000 admissions to hospital a year as well as costing an estimated $36 billion annually.

The Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education have released a report arguing not enough is being done to curb alcohol-related social damage.

The number of deaths had risen by 62 per cent from 2000 to 2010.

This might have been avoided if recommendations made in a 1977 Senate Committee report had not been ignored, a study by the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE), released on Wednesday, found.

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Consistently, the participants reported different emotional responses to different alcoholic beverages.

Red wine and beer were reported to be the most relaxing drinks, with 52.8 percent of respondents saying that the former boosted relaxation, and almost 50 percent indicating that beer helped them to wind down.

Spirits were reported as the least conducive to a relaxed state, as only 20 percent of respondents said that distilled drinks helped them to relieve tension.

Almost 30 percent of survey respondents who drank spirits said that they felt more aggressive when they chose this type of alcohol. By contrast, only 2.5 percent of red wine drinkers blamed this beverage for a rise in feelings of aggression.

At the same time, however, more than half of the respondents reported that spirits boosted their confidence and energy levels, and 42.4 percent said that these strong drinks made them feel sexier.

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