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Data Site

Introduction: Welcome to AODstats, the Victorian alcohol and drug interactive statistics and mapping webpage.
AODstats provides information on the harms related to alcohol, illicit and pharmaceutical drug use in Victoria.

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 5 August 2017

The Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE) welcomed the opportunity to make a supplementary submission to the NT Alcohol Policies and Legislation Review The Tobacco effect: The alcohol industry casting doubt.

Recognising how powerful vested interests have conspired to undermine science by merchandising doubt, and have run deliberate yet effective campaigns that have distorted public debate and mislead the public, this submission sought to expose the industry tactics and set the record straight.

The alcohol industry’s submissions to the NT Alcohol Policies and Legislation Review are replete with examples of this merchandising of doubt: there is not enough proof to justify regulation, and insufficient evidence to act; insisting the science is uncertain; emphasising true but irrelevant facts; cherry-picking facts out of context; and claiming the science is being manipulated to fulfill a political agenda. After all, these tactics used by the alcohol industry to resist government regulation and undermine good public policy are straight out of the tobacco industry’s playbook.

Full article


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TEENS are less likely to drink if they know that alcohol is a major cause of cancer, but most are unaware of the link, a South Australian study has found.

More than 2800 school students aged 12-17 were surveyed about their drinking behaviour by Adelaide University and South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) researchers. Those aged 14-17 were deterred from drinking if they knew about the link between alcohol and cancer, but only 28 per cent of students were aware of the connection. Parental disapproval was another deterrent, while smoking and approval from friends resulted in higher rates of drinking.

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By medical reporter Sophie Scott 30 Jun 2017, 12:44pm

More than three quarters of court cases where local communities are against big alcohol stores being built are being thrown out because judges do not have to consider the health impacts of planning decisions.

Key points:

  • Public health and family violence impacts are not considered by courts when deciding whether to approve liquor stores
  • Advocates say loophole needs to be closed to prevent stores being built in areas with high domestic violence rates
  • Alcohol industry says most licensing authorities already consider public interest

In the first study of its kind, researchers from the Australian Prevention Partnership Centre, based at Sax Institute and the George Institute for Global Health, found that in more than 75 per cent of cases across Australia, the courts found in favour of the alcohol industry.

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By Catharine Paddock PhD

Published 7th  June 2017

The results of a new study have shown that even moderate alcohol intake can have a negative impact on cognitive health.

A new study concludes that even moderate alcohol consumption is linked to a raised risk of faster decline in brain health and mental function. The researchers say that their findings support the United Kingdom's recent tightening of guidance on alcohol and question the limits given in the United States guidelines… The data included information about weekly alcohol consumption and regular measures of brain function and mental performance. The participants also had an MRI brain scan at the end of the study.

When they analyzed the data, the researchers found that higher alcohol intake over the 30-year study period was tied to a higher risk of atrophy or tissue degeneration in the hippocampus, which is a part of the brain that is important for spatial orientation and memory.

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Adolescents who drink alcohol are at increased risk for injury and substance use disorder later in life, even when they do not meet criteria for alcohol use disorder (AUD). This study assessed changes in grey matter volumes over a 10-year period between adolescence and early adulthood in individuals who had alcohol use (as defined by AUDIT-C score), but did not meet criteria for AUD or use other substances.

  • The following areas had smaller grey matter volumes in participants with “heavy” drinking when compared with those with “light” consumption* (control): bilateral subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, right orbitofrontal and frontopolar cortex, right superior temporal gyrus, and the right insular cortex.

* Defined by authors as: heavy = AUDIT-C score of ≥4 for males or ≥3 for females; light = AUDIT-C score of ≤2.

Comments: This study demonstrates that even levels of alcohol consumption that may be considered benign “experimentation” during adolescence are associated with smaller grey matter in several brain regions. Functional changes in the insular cortex are associated with propensity to return to substance use; disrupted development in this area may be the basis of the association between early initiation and increased risk of AUD in adulthood. The results underscore the risks of adolescent alcohol use and suggest that AUD diagnostic criteria may not be sensitive enough to identify them in this population.

Sharon Levy, MD, MPH

Reference: Heikkinen N, Niskanen E, Könönen M, et al. Alcohol consumption during adolescence is associated with reduced grey matter volumes

Addiction. 2017;112(4):604–613.

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