'minimising harm by maximising prevention'

  

ALCOHOL
VOLUME SALES
– VICTORIA

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AOD STATS
Interactive
Data Site

Introduction: Welcome to AODstats, the Victorian alcohol and drug interactive statistics and mapping webpage.
AODstats provides information on the harms related to alcohol, illicit and pharmaceutical drug use in Victoria.

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Australians are drinking 25 per cent less alcohol than they were 40 years ago, but it's causing more harm than ever, a new study says.

In 2010, when the most recent figures were recorded, alcohol misuse was estimated to be responsible for 5500 deaths and 160,000 admissions to hospital a year as well as costing an estimated $36 billion annually.

The Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education have released a report arguing not enough is being done to curb alcohol-related social damage.

The number of deaths had risen by 62 per cent from 2000 to 2010.

This might have been avoided if recommendations made in a 1977 Senate Committee report had not been ignored, a study by the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE), released on Wednesday, found.

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Consistently, the participants reported different emotional responses to different alcoholic beverages.

Red wine and beer were reported to be the most relaxing drinks, with 52.8 percent of respondents saying that the former boosted relaxation, and almost 50 percent indicating that beer helped them to wind down.

Spirits were reported as the least conducive to a relaxed state, as only 20 percent of respondents said that distilled drinks helped them to relieve tension.

Almost 30 percent of survey respondents who drank spirits said that they felt more aggressive when they chose this type of alcohol. By contrast, only 2.5 percent of red wine drinkers blamed this beverage for a rise in feelings of aggression.

At the same time, however, more than half of the respondents reported that spirits boosted their confidence and energy levels, and 42.4 percent said that these strong drinks made them feel sexier.

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  • Chronic alcohol drinking kills stem cells in key regions of the brain and reduces the development of new nerve cells in adults 
  • For the first time, research showed that female brains showed more severe deficits than males
  • Researchers said this discovery provides a new way of approaching the problem of alcohol-related changes in the brain

By Kayla Brantley For Dailymail.com  PUBLISHED: 14 November 2017

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BMJ 2017; 356 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j909 

(Published 22 March 2017) Cite this as: BMJ 2017;356:j909

Conclusions

Collectively, our findings, from the most comprehensive study to date of the relation between alcohol consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease, indicate that moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a lower risk of initially presenting with several, but not all, cardiovascular diseases. Similarly, we show that heavy drinking is differentially associated with a range of such diseases. This has implications for patient counselling, public health communication, and disease prediction algorithms and suggests the necessity for a more nuanced approach to the role of alcohol consumption in the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

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Key findings 

  • Change in alcohol consumption per capita was significantly and positively associated with change in both male and female head and neck cancer mortality, particularly among males and females aged 50 and above. 
  • Change in alcohol consumption per capita was significantly and positively associated with change in male liver cancer mortality, particularly among males aged 50-69. 
  • The results suggest that one litre decreases in annual alcohol consumption per capita were associated with reductions of 11.6 per cent in male and 7.3 per cent in female head and neck cancer mortality across a 20-year period. 
  • The results also suggest that one litre decreases in annual alcohol consumption per capita were associated with a reduction of male liver cancer mortality of 15.0 per cent across a 20-year period. 
  • In total, it is estimated from the analysis that about 6.5 per cent of male and 4.1 per cent of female head and neck cancer deaths were related to alcohol consumption in Australia between 1968 and 2011.
  • Alcohol consumption was estimated to be responsible for 8.4 per cent of male liver cancer deaths in Australia in the last 50 years

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  • Victoria
  • Dalgarno Central
    (Coalition of Alcohol & Drug Educators)

    Phone: 1300 975 002
    Fax: 1300 952 551
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    Dandenong, Vic, 3175


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